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Between 1970 -1973 with the studio albums Emerson, Lake and Palmer, Trilogy, Tarkus and Brain Salad Surgery, ELP created some of prog rock’s most seminal and enduring music with their battalions of musically adventurous material framed by world class musicianship and the powerful vocals of bassist Greg Lake. Now with the band’s catalog being reissued as special 2-CD deluxe remastered editions (Emerson, Lake & Palmer (1970), Tarkus (1971), Pictures At An Exhibition (1971), Trilogy (1972), Brain Salad Surgery (1973) and Welcome Back, My Friends, To The Show That Never Ends – Ladies And Gentlemen – Emerson, Lake & Palmer (1974) teeming with a generous helping of bonus material (new mixes, alternate tracks,…

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And now, an archival interview with Randy Meisner, conducted by Ken Sharp a few years ago… Working with the likes of Poco and Rick Nelson’s Stone Canyon Band, Randy Meisner found international fame as a founding member of Eagles. An immensely talented bass player and versatile singer/songwriter, Meisner delivered the band’s 1975 smash million seller, “Take It To The Limit.” Randy remained an integral force in the Eagles throughout the group’s ’70s heyday, exiting the group in 1977 upon the completion of the Hotel California tour. After splitting from the Eagles, Meisner released a several moderately successful solo albums, Randy Meisner…

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This is the conclusion to last month’s interview with Mike Love of the Beach Boys — get caught up with Part 1 here, and enjoy the rest below. Rock Cellar Magazine: What’s the back story behind the song “Happy Birthday Mike Love”? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NtC0wsP6FCo Mike Love: I was in India studying with the Maharishi and The Beatles were there as well. It was my birthday, March 15th, 1968 George Harrison had his birthday on February 25th and there were fireworks and music. It was a really fun thing. Maharishi being the ultimate host created a party for my birthday and Donovan and…

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Reflecting back on Jimi Hendrix’s career, one marvels at how productive and creative he was in a short span of just a few years. By the time Hendrix formed Band of Gypsys with long-time pal Billy Cox and drummer Buddy Miles, he was moving in a different direction stylistically, shaking the foundation of his artistry and fulfilling his hungry quest for continual musical evolution and exploration. The music he wrote and performed with Band of Gypsys demonstrated his forward-thinking creativity. The band impressed most in a live setting, allowing the trio to stretch out, going on expansive musical adventures combining fiery, virtuosic…

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After years in the scene as a member of the Smiths, not to mention his work with acts as eclectic as the Pretenders, Paul McCartney, Modest Mouse, Pet Shop Boys, Bryan Ferry and as a prolific solo artist, you might imagine Johnny Marr has stories to tell. He does, indeed, and on November 3 he’ll release his official autobiography, Set the Boy Free. Said Marr about the book: “I wanted to convey a feeling of breaking free, that has been a constant throughout my life. A feeling that expresses itself as both escape and discovery. Transcendence. I found it through…

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Decades after the release of Dio’s early ’80s albums, in particular, Holy Diver and The Last In Line, those recordings are widely recognized by music fans and critics alike as towering achievements in ’80s hard rock. Helping carve out the metallic fury of those landmark alums was Northern Irish guitarist Vivian Campbell, whose tough and strident playing and fierce acrobatic solos helped him garner acclaim as a shining new talent on the hard rock scene. In 1985, creative and personal differences between Campbell and Ronnie James Dio led him to depart from Dio after the group’s third album, Sacred Heart, and he found a permanent home in Def Leppard. Through the years, Campbell has enjoyed a particularly productive…

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Steve Rosen checks in with another entry in Behind the Curtain… Down through the years, the term “mad genius” has been given to those rare human beings who straddled the line between eccentric and brilliant. Leonardo DaVinci only slept two hours a day and was dyslexic. Thomas Edison—the American who invented the phonograph and the lightbulb—was a slob. Dr. Yoshiro Nakamatsu—the modern day inventor who patented the floppy disk in 1952—did much of his thinking in a bathroom tiled in 24-karat gold tiles as well as deep underwater where he would remain submerged to the point of drowning. Steve Jobs…

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The young always have the same problem – how to rebel and conform at the same time. They have now solved this by defying their parents and copying one another. — Quentin Crisp James Dean was a rebel. Marlon Brando was a rebel. Johnny Yuma was a rebel. You’re not. But listening to some of our Top 11 Rebel Songs may get you there. We’re Not Gonna Take It by Twisted Sister Despite their success, Twisted Sister’s We’re Not Gonna Take It was the metal band’s only Top 40 hit. Frontman Dee Snider told Wikimetal that the song was born…

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“Mudcrutch’s whole approach is like a power band,” Roger McGuinn, the founder of The Byrds, tells me when I catch up with him after seeing him in New York City with Tom Petty’s “other” band. “They’re more like Rolling Stones than Beatles. It’s a powerful, punchy band.” But McGuinn, who tours the world solo these days, says it wasn’t much of an adjustment to sit in with his old friends from the Heartbreakers. “I play with the Rock Bottom Remainders almost every year,” he says of the band of best-selling authors, including Scott Turow, Amy Tan and Stephen King, that…

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Producer George Martin was thrust head first into the eye of the hurricane when The Beatles performed a series of now historic concerts held at The Hollywood Bowl in 1964 and 1965. Surrounded by thousands of unruly screaming Beatlemaniacs, he witnessed first-hand the mania, excitement and fever pitch generated by the Fab Four, an unforgettable experience he described in the liner notes to the Beatles At The Hollywood Bowl album issued in 1977 on Capitol Records: “The chaos, I might almost say panic, that reigned at these concerts was unbelievable unless you were there. Only three-track recording was possible; The Beatles had no…

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