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Note: This interview with Benmont Tench was conducted a few years back, well before the COVID-19 pandemic of 2020.  Walk into Benmont Tench’s home and you’ll immediately know you’ve entered the dwelling of a musician. In the expansive living room belonging to the co-founder of Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers, flanked by walls of books, vinyl records and various instruments — acoustic and electric guitars, an Epiphone bass, a ukelele, Wurlitzer piano and a grand piano once owned by keyboard legend Nicky Hopkins — resides the soul and heartbeat of the room, his turntable. Benmont Tench is a devoted vinyl…

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On Sunset, the new album from Paul Weller, was just released on July 3, but the U.K. music legend says he’s already deep into the making of its follow-up when he calls from his Black Barn Studio in England to discuss the making of On Sunset and how’s he’s been filling his days during the COVID-19 pandemic that forced the cancellation of his 2020 live dates, including a fall tour of America. “The first track — ‘Mirror Ball’ — was going to a b-side for the last album, True Meanings, but it was too good for that, I thought, and…

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B.B. King, who passed away in 2015, earned the title “The King of the Blues” over more than 6 decades as a guitarist and singer. But being the eldest of B.B. King’s 15 children did not make Shirley King aspire to become a blues singer, as King performed as an exotic dancer for 21 years before making her professional singing debut in 1989. King’s new album on Cleopatra Records, Blues for a King, is available today, which is Juneteenth, the holiday commemorating the end of slavery. “That’s a very special day for all of us, not just African Americans but…

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Ronnie Wood is a certifiable rock legend. Keith Richards’ guitar foil in the Rolling Stones since the 1970s, Wood had already made his name as a member of not only the Faces, but the Jeff Beck Group, and had been a mainstay of the London music scene since his days in much-loved but near-forgotten band The Birds, before joining Mick Jagger and company. But the now-sober Wood has added several interesting jobs to his long resume since joining the Stones. He’s been a go-to session guitarist, a DJ and TV interviewer, world-renowned painter and author. In recent weeks, Wood’s social…

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When Brian Jones of The Rolling Stones was found dead in the swimming pool of his UK home July 3, 1969, many believed he had been a victim of a life of excess and drugs. The conservative British press and police reveled in the news; for years they had portrayed the Stones as a dangerous influence on youth. Jones, who formed the Stones in 1962, had been a heavy drug user for years. His drug problems would lead to his firing from the band in June 1969, so it seemed logical that he would drown after a result of drug…

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Television has been a common reference point in the career of Dramarama.  During some mid-Eighties tours, the Wayne, New Jersey-bred band would adorn its stage with multiple TV sets. Johnny Carson was also namechecked in the songs “Baby Rhino’s Eye” and alt-rock radio hit “Last Cigarette.”  Then there was “70’s TV,” off 1989’s Stuck in Wonderamaland, which found front man John Easdale singing about watching reruns of Perry Mason, All In the Family, Emergency, Adam-12, The Partridge Family.  Flash forward to the present and Color TV, Dramarama’s first new studio album in 15 years, sports an antique television set projecting…

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With a return to live concerts unlikely for 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, join us for the next best thing, more recollections from noted rock luminaries queried about their favorite live rock artist/band/concerts — this follows Part 1 of the series. Randy Meisner (The Eagles): The best show I’ve ever seen bar none was The Band, who along with Bob Dylan are my favorite artists of all time. I saw them at Filthy McNasty’s, a little funky club in North Hollywood. I don’t go to a lot of concerts but that show still sticks in my brain. They did all…

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Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame icon Dion first scored major success almost sixty years ago with smash hits like “The Wanderer,” “Runaround Sue” and “Ruby Baby.” Since then, Dion continued on a path of reinvention as an artist, from blues to gospel to rock and roll, and to this day he continues pushing forward, exploring new artistic territory. Today, June 5, Dion has delivered an impressive new album, Blues With Friends, a record that finds him collaborating with heavyweight luminaries numbering Bruce Springsteen, Paul Simon, Van Morrison, Billy Gibbons, Joe Bonamassa and many more. Join us for a candid…

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Whether it’s The Who, The Rolling Stones or Foo Fighters tearing it up in stadiums, witnessing KISS, Aerosmith or Madonna in a large amphitheater or The Supersuckers kickin’ out the jams in a local club, witnessing unforgettable live concerts is one of the great joys in life. Given the strict guidelines imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s looking very likely that a return to live performances is not happening anytime soon. To help satiate your jones for live music, we queried a myriad of famous musicians to share their favorite live concerts or live bands. Below, enjoy the first installment…

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When Dennis DeYoung performed “The Best of Times” recently from home on piano and posted it to YouTube, it didn’t take long for his 1981 Top 10 hit with Styx to garner 900K+ views. No surprise there. One of the Chicago rock band’s more enduring tunes, lyrics like “I know you feel these are the worst of times/I do believe it’s true/When people lock their doors and hide inside/Rumor has it/It’s the end of paradise” have obviously struck a chord during the COVID-19 pandemic.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVzx-VO0RpI Dennis DeYoung and the Music of Styx: Live in Los Angeles, a spirited concert 2014…

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