Check out our Youtube Channel

Video interviews with all your favorite stars!

Download all your music here

Author Rock Cellar Magazine Staff

Music videos used to “mean something.”  Back in the 1980s and 1990s, when MTV was somewhat close to relevant and had a reason for “music” to be a third of its acronym, it was actually pretty entertaining to watch a music video.  Michael Jackson turned into a werewolf and danced with a street gang of the undead, Slash played elaborate guitar solos while unplugged in a patch of barren farmland, Metallica paired brooding thrash metal with depressingly dark post-World War 1 films, and so on. In the years since MTV decided to focus more on trashy reality shows instead of music, bands…

Share.

Britpop brats Oasis scored an international smash hit with their album (What’s The Story?) Morning Glory in 1995, but it could have been an ugly mess. Right before its release, the song Step Out was clipped from the record, because of its mimicry of Stevie Wonder’s Uptight (Everything’s Alright). It’s pretty darn close: you can basically sing Uptight over the chorus of Step Out. Even Noel Gallagher’s vocals follow a similar pattern to Wonder’s in the original song. There weren’t any lawsuits over the song, which became an obscure Oasis b-side, and the British lads were lucky that was the…

Share.

A first for “Ripped Off Riffs” category: An artist is accused of ripping himself off? John Hiatt just released his brand new album Dirty Jeans and Mudslide Hymns with a grungy new track called “Damn This Town.” With its minor chords, chopping guitar and biting lyrics it furthers Hiatt’s reputation as a down-and-dirty story-teller. Only thing is… haven’t we heard this riff before? In 1993? Damn This Town Perfectly Good Guitar [poll id=”6″]

Share.

Forget about cats jumping on trampolines, cute Asian kids dozing off, or local news anchors not realizing their microphone’s hot when expressing their true opinions regarding their co-workers, there’s no more perfect match for YouTube than videos of Rube Goldberg machines. They’re short, visually-compelling and force you to watch them over and over just to see what’s actually happening. (These, by the way, are the same reasons why porn is so popular.) With a new contraption put together by the Canadian photography company 2D Photography making the rounds (see below) it’s time to put together a conclusive and not-to-be-debated list…

Share.

Another one bites the dust. The Sahara Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas has closed, slated for demolition or re-brand and extensive re-model. While perhaps not quite as retro-cool as The Sands or The Dunes, the Sahara still exemplified the “Vegas Baby” vibe of the 50s and 60s and hosted numerous A-list performers including members of the legendary “Rat Pack.” Here is a walk down Memory Strip, with some nostalgic photos of a bygone era. Unless otherwise noted, these photographs are from the Nevada News Bureau archives.

Share.

Remember the classic video for Bruce Springsteen’s Dancing in the Dark? The one with a young Courteney Cox (not Cox-Arquette, mind you) dancing around joyfully while a white-shirted Boss semi-awkwardly flailed his arms around onstage? Take that iconic, ultra-80s moment and imagine it without a crowd, stage, or Cox. Imagine Bruce just standing in a room, dancing in place for the entirety of the video. As recently-unearthed footage of the original video treatment for the song revealed, that nightmare-ish (and potentially embarrassing) video concept could have made the final cut. A Jazzercise-ready, headbanded Bruce bops back and forth when the camera…

Share.

Attention all Glee fans and musical theatre buffs: Have you wondered what it’s like to be a part of a Broadway musical production? What if you were paid to travel the world and perform nightly for thousands of fans, never staying more than a few weeks in the same city? It sounds like the ultimate dream to anyone in show biz, but for the sixty-seven cast and crew members touring with the 25th anniversary of Les Misérables, it is a thrilling reality. The universally adored musical kicked off its fourth U.S. tour here in Los Angeles last month to much…

Share.

Ever since Spinal Tap skewered classic rock bands with their excess, egos and miniature Stonehenge stage props back in 1984, many other fictional musicians and bands have popped up in movies and television programs. While Rob Reiner’s fake-rock legends, made up of the amazingly-named David St. Hubbins, Nigel Tufnel and Derek Smalls, may have set the bar impossibly high, there have been some pretty great examples over the years. Some are composites of real-life musicians, whereas others are just farcical clichés fleshed out on-screen for laughs and satirical value. A few of the most notable acts began as comedy sketch…

Share.

It was November 1977. Guitarist Rory Gallagher and his band members – bassist Gerry McAvoy, keyboardist Lou Martin and drummer Rod de’Ath – were capping off a 6-month world tour with dates in Japan before coming to San Francisco to begin work on a new studio album. Gallagher had signed a deal with Chrysalis Records and would be working with hotshot producer Elliot Mazer, whose clients included Neil Young, Janis Joplin, Gordon Lightfoot and The Band. The songs were recorded quickly, but the sessions were dogged with tension and Rory’s belief that the mixing was too complicated. He was also…

Share.

One of Nirvana’s huge hits from Nevermind, Come As You Are features a down-tuned riff that bears a heavy resemblance to Killing Joke’s song Eighties. Killing Joke never did the lawsuit thing over the song, but everyone pretty much knew it was the same riff. Nirvana drummer and Foo Fighter founder Dave Grohl actually played drums on the band’s 2003 album, which some believe was a penance for knowing that Come As You Are lifted the riff from Eighties. To make things even more complicated, The Damned’s Life Goes On, which came out in 1982, well before Eighties, includes practically…

Share.
1 58 59 60 61