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Author Marshall Ward

It’s an unsettling tale of terror and tormented humanity.  A small village has fallen under a vampire’s curse, and the boundaries between the real and unreal have blurred. Steven Severin, co-founding member of Siouxsie and the Banshees, has composed a new score for Vampyr, the 1932 horror movie by Danish director Carl Theodor Dreyer.  Severin is currently on tour, screening the film and playing the instrumental score solo on stage — his third Music for Silents project. Severin co-created Siouxsie and the Banshees alongside goth priestess Siouxsie Sioux in 1976, and was featured on all 16 albums and 30 singles as…

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Caroll Spinney may be the most unknown famous person in America… “It’s the Bird and Grouch who’s famous, not me,” says Spinney, the man who has spent the last 43 years in a bird costume (and a trash can) as Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch. Muppets creator Jim Henson once acknowledged Spinney as “the only genius I’ve ever known.” It was 50 years ago that the two puppeteers first met — a meeting that would make an indelible impact on Spinney, who was hired by Henson to perform as Big Bird and Oscar on Sesame Street, from the show’s…

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In the liner notes to Daniel Lanois’ 2003 album Shine, the musician and producer writes: “What a privilege to be able to make music. And what an honor to have it received and appreciated.” “Appreciated” may be something of an understatement, given Lanois’ legendary reputation in the music industry and the ample praise heaped upon him by his peers — most recently with the announcement of his induction into the Canadian Music Industry Hall of Fame on March 22, 2012. Daniel Lanois. Photo © Zoran Orlic; all rights reserved Lanois has made an indelible mark on the industry by producing career-defining albums for…

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In the song Hard Lovin’ Woman, Juliette Lewis belts out: “You better look around and get a hold of yourself, woman, and embrace what you’ve become.” What Juliette Lewis has become (apart from a Hollywood actress) is a bona fide rock star, touring summer festivals and nightclubs around the world.  Blender magazine hailed her as one of the hottest women of rock music, proclaiming she “delivered sonically varnished melodic punk replete with purring vocals and lyrics that bash porn, pharmaceutical companies and rotten lovers (in no particular order).” Lewis’ work in such films as Cape Fear, Kalifornia and Natural Born Killers made her famous — arguably more famous…

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Some songs seem as if they were written just for you.  The lyrics resonate as if they were penned by your own personal biographer. Judy Collins gets that feeling every time she hears the song Suite: Judy Blue Eyes by legendary folk trio Crosby, Stills and Nash. But then, that song really was written just for Collins. “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes really is my story…” The songstress and human rights activist writes in her new memoir, aptly titled Sweet Judy Blue Eyes: My Life In Music.  “Whenever I hear the song – in a grocery store, in an airport, on my own CD player – it resounds…

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Vincent Price, in that unmistakable velvety tone, once said: “A man who limits his interests, limits his life.” This year marks (what would have been) Vincent Price’s 100th birthday, and though he is no longer alive to celebrate, his legacy as one of the most enduring icons of 20th century horror cinema lives on. His classic films, from House of Wax to The Fly to The Ten Commandments, are being screened in theatres and festivals across North America, as fans hail 2011 as “The Vincentennial.” In celebration of her father’s 100th anniversary, Victoria Price has been traveling and promoting everything…

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Greenwich Village, by ushering in the dawn of free speech, free love, and politically engaged art, changed the world forever. The artists who emerged – from Arlo Guthrie to Buffy Sainte-Marie to Bob Dylan – challenged the status quo by singing about civil liberties, protesting the Vietnam War, and holding governments accountable for their actions. Their music was heard. Their message universal. Their outcome revolutionary. Yet there has never been an in-depth film — with over 20 interviews, rare archival footage, and new performances — made about the militant Greenwich Village music scene that so deeply and irreversibly changed the…

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Edgar Winter / Photos © Mark Walton (all rights reserved) With his white mop and pigment-free skin, Edgar Winter revolutionized rock and roll by inventing the keyboard strap, an innovation that allows him the freedom to move around on stage during multi-instrumental, high-energy performances like his timeless hit Frankenstein. Having recently returned from an extensive tour of Europe, where he performed with Ringo Starr & His All-Star Band, the indefatigable Winter – who has 20-plus albums to his credit – chatted with Rock Cellar Magazine from his home in Beverly Hills, before heading off again to tour South America this fall.…

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