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Author Jeff Cazanov

A contract for the Beatles’ 1965 concert at the Cow Palace in San Francisco reveals that the band had put in an anti-segregation clause:  “Artists will not be required to perform before a segregated audience.” Perhaps it was that phrase alone that increased the value of that contract which sold for $23,033 (£14,800) at a Los Angeles auction Tuesday.  Original forecasters thought it would only take in 3-4 thousand. The Beatles had taken this stand earlier, specifically in 1964 when they refused to play a planned segregated concert in Florida’s Gator Bowl.  Ultimately the city backed down, and changed the…

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Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Gives Bittersweet Note To “Ghost on the Canvas.” Ghost on the Canvas is the just-released final album by music legend Glen Campbell.  He’s using the word “final” himself, as Campbell recently disclosed that he has been dealing with the effects of Alzheimer’s disease, since 2009. The new album by the famous former member of “The Wrecking Crew” enlists the support of several well-known musicians such as Jakob Dylan, Rick Nielsen of Cheap Trick, Chris Isaak, Dick Dale, Brian Setzer, Billy Corgan, and even the Dandy Warhols. The title track Ghost on the Canvas was written by Replacements front-man…

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Why do we love the Beatles? Maybe it’s because they almost single-handedly shaped two generations and continue to influence new music fans, year after year? Strip away their incredible style and you’ve got s-u-b-s-t-a-n-c-e up the wazoo. We’ve been celebrating and digging up every lone fact on the Beatles for over 5 decades. Just when you think it’s all been done here comes “George Harrison: Living In The Material World,” a new Beatles documentary by Martin Scorsese. If the trailer is any indication of how good this movie is going to be, we are in for a mind-blowing treat: Most…

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Today, it’s not only authors and philosophers who go through a process of self-examination as they do their jobs. Artists and musicians, too, often working in their claustrophobic vacuums of creative inspiration, feel the (oft-times destructive) need to judge their own works in relation to the societies that they were born into, and in which they create. Has there ever been a writer or musician born that hasn’t at one time said about his or her work… “What’s the point?” “What does it all matter?,” or “Who-so shall tell a tale aftere a man1 and, furthermore, who frikkin’ cares?” What…

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In 1969, John Lennon and Yoko Ono staged the first bed-in, an attempt for world peace through staying in bed. Their ultimate goal was to enlighten the world, and put the power back into the hands of the people during the height of the Vietnam War. While you can make of the protest what you wish, it is now possible to watch the seventy-minute documentary filmed over the course of a week in the hotel room in Montreal where they stayed. It was originally scheduled to air for one weekend only. Yoko extended “Bed Peace” at her website and made…

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Chatsworth, California – August 4, 2011 Rock Cellar Magazine, a new music and entertainment website recently interviewed drummer Bill Ward who revealed that Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath indeed played together, confirming the infamous “Black Zeppelin session.” Music journalist Marshall Ward, on assignment for Rock Cellar Magazine, has been a lifelong fan of both bands, but particularly Black Sabbath. For decades, unconfirmed rumors had swirled that Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath met in a recording studio in the 1970s for a jam session. Despite this, no one had talked about this in any detail, and Ward made it his mission…

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When a band releases somewhere north of ten full-length records, multiple EPs, and participates in numerous side projects and still toils away in relative anonymity, you might come to expect that there will come a day when that band will attempt to depart from what makes them unique. That they will venture down a path that the nabobs of the commercial world have determined is the only avenue to stride upon if they want to widen their circle of audience members. But for Centro-matic – unlike many before them – that fateful day would appear to still be nigh. As…

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Photos by Frank Buddenbrock; all rights reserved RCM: Do you consider yourself more of a business manager, a personal manager or both? PA: I was a personal manager yes, ‘cause the two are very much interwoven. Suddenly when James was having drug difficulties and stuff, inevitably you get involved. You try and help them sort things out. RCM: Some managers are a bad influence. That artists are looking for their manager to be the guiding voice and it’s to the contrary? PA: Maybe so. And then the whole drug thing – it’s the misfortune that there are inevitably people who…

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Photography by Frank Buddenbrock From his musical days with Peter & Gordon through his careers as a Grammy-award winning producer, artist manager, Apple A&R man, and record company executive, Peter Asher has witnessed and participated in the entire spectrum of the record-making industry. Rock Cellar Magazine sat down with this artistic legend in an informal interview covering highlights of his five-decade ride. RCM: You’ve listened to a lot of music, judged it, and obviously found some of the best. Do you think that rock is tapped out? PA: No. They’ve thought it about every kind of music. “How many bloody…

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Guitars share a special bond with their players, and those partnerships often outlast those between humans. These 11 are not necessarily the most recognizable guitars, or necessarily ones that defined a sound, but these are the guitars that have stood the test of time. These guitars were given names. Sometimes, we know them by that name alone… 1. “Lucille” – B.B. King Legend has it King saved his guitar from a fire in an Arkansas dance-hall where he was performing. The fire was caused by a fight he witnessed – over a girl named Lucille. Ever since, he’s named all of…

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